Events 2014

GIFT – Christmas show 2014

Seasons Greetings from the Arts & Disability Forum

11th to 20th December 2014 from 11am until 4pm

Seasonal celebration: Thursday 18th December, 5-7pm
Have a glass of hot port while you buy!

paintings | prints | drawings | photographs | jewellery | textiles | decorations | glassware cards | ceramics | books | chocolates

crippen


The iDA grant deadline is approaching fast ...

trevor front

Download documents below:

iDA Application form

iDA Criteria and FAQs

iDA Guidelines

iDA Monitoring form

 


 

Significant Objects by Jim McKeever

21th October to 28th November 2014

Jim McKeever

Launch: Monday 20th October, 5-7pm
Artist's Conversation: Tuesday 28th October, 2pm

Part of the Ulster Bank Belfast Festival at Queen’s, this photographic exhibition by Jim McKeever is staged at the Arts & Disability Forum. There will be an exhibition launch  on Monday 20th October at 5-7pm.

This exhibition tells the story of John, who was placed in care with the Sisters of Nazareth at just one day old and didn’t leave the system until seventeen years later. Collaborating with John over two years, photographer Jim McKeever has created an intense narrative visualising places and objects that represent physical and mental pain.

continue reading...

 


 

 

resistance

PDF Resistance Information

PDF Educational Brouchure

 

Powerful arts installation brings Nazi atrocities to life

In September 1939 Adolf Hitler authorised Aktion-T4 a forced euthanasia programme that led the mass murder of tens of thousands of disabled adults and children and formed the blueprint for his ‘Final Solution’ against the Jews.

 This relatively little known Nazi outrage forms the backdrop for ‘Resistance’, a challenging and poignant multi-media installation, which will be open to the public  at the Titanic Drawing Offices from October 21st  to November 2nd, as part of the Ulster Bank Belfast Festival at Queen’s. This is a Northern Ireland premiere and will be the only time the work is seen here.

The piece, which combines moving images, drama, documentary and whispering voices into an immersive audio-visual experience, is by controversial, award-winning writer-director Liz Crow, whose work has been shown at Tate Modern and the British Film Institute. Resistance was showcased to 4500 visitors at Washington DC’s Kennedy Centre and won a Best Exhibition Award from the Liverpool Daily Post. 

Chris Ledger, Director of the Arts and Disability Forum (ADF) has worked behind the scenes for the past two years to bring this important show to Belfast. She said the artist chose Belfast for the final booking of the tour because of a belief in the city's vibrancy and atmosphere of hope. 

She said: “We are excited to bring this wonderful project to Northern Ireland. Resistance's starting point is the horrors of Nazism but it resonates with contemporary attitudes towards disabled people and with wider issues around marginalisation, exclusion and oppression.

 

The work emerged from Liz Crow’s alarm at the direction in which she saw society heading. Rising hate crime, increased pre-natal screening and abortion and a race to assisted suicide are challenging the worth of disabled people’s lives and even their right to exist. Alongside this, Belfast has also seen an increase in racially motivated hate crime. Resistance invites the audience to reflect on how they can help to shape a society that delights in diversity. ”

At the centre of the installation is a haunting 12 minute film about Aktion-T4 that Liz made using a cast of mainly disabled actors. The cast and the writer visited two of the killing centres in Germany as research.

The film has as its lead character Elise a woman who swept the floors and the grounds of a holding centre, housing disabled people before they go to their deaths. She silently watches people disappear and plots what she can do.

Archive material is also used in the installation.

Liz Crow is well known as an activist as well as an artist. In August 2009 she was hoisted by a cherry picker to sit in her wheelchair on Anthony Gormley’s Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar, wearing an SS Uniform and brandishing the Nazi flag.This was to highlight the hidden history of Germany’s forgotten disabled victims and the resurgence of negative attitudes towards disabled people in today’s society. On September 2nd in Berlin, a new memorial was unveiled to commemorate the deaths of disabled people killed by Nazis who deemed them "useless eaters".

The 30 minute installation has been brought to Belfast with project funds from the Community Relations Council and Belfast City Council and Children in Need are supporting the inclusive involvement of young people. The Arts Council is the Arts & Disability Forum's principal funder and the ADF receives additional core funds from Belfast City Council and LLoyds TSB Foundation.

Liz Crow said: “This is an episode of history that is virtually hidden, yet the values that underpinned it still echo through disabled people’s lives today. It is a timely piece of work and I hope that people will be both moved and empowered by it. I want people to come away feeling inspired to get involved, be effective and find the courage to be a part of change. Resistance is about a sense of possibility.” 

Available with audio description, captions, BSL interpretation and an induction loop.

Group Bookings through the Arts & Disability Forum at

www.adf.ie, info@adf.ie, tel028 9023 9450.

 

 


 

Bounce! Arts festival weekender

August 2014

About Bounce!

 


 

Trevor Wray
Over and Over and Over

20th June to 14th August 2014

trevor front

This photographic exhibition by Trevor Wray is staged at the Arts & Disability Forum Gallery, on the ground floor of Cathedral Quarter Workspaces, at 109-113 Royal Avenue in Belfast.

From bonfires and parades to cats on windowsills and Scrabo Tower, Trevor Wray has layered an array of imagery that forms a series of surreal encounters. The title; Over and Over and Over refers to the activity of using a single roll of 35mm film and shooting it through an SLR camera several times, creating multiple exposures within each frame. Trevor is bipolar and both the approach and the content of the work relate to this.

 Trevor says,

“Hypermania is the polar opposite of depression and being so it is optimistic in its outlook on life. You can be just too bubbly and that’s where the problem lies; it continues on a 24/7 basis, on and on, until a person runs on empty. Then people see the power of the condition because the next stage is down into guilt, exasperation, doubt and paranoia.”

The preview will be at 5-7pm on Thursday 19th June at the ADF Gallery on Royal Avenue. Light refreshments will be available. Following the preview, the exhibition will be open to the public from 20th June until 14th August between 11am to 3pm, Tuesday to Friday. Trevor will do a talk at the Arts & Disability Forum on July 31st at 1pm as part of the ADF Conversations series.

BSL communication support is provisionally booked for the preview and talk – deaf people please confirm by Tuesday 17th June if you want to attend either of these. Audio description is also available with advance notice (usually for the day of the preview or talk). Please book both types of support by emailing leo@adf.ie or phoning 028 9023 9450.

For further information, images from the exhibition or interviews with the artist, please telephone 028 9023 9450 or email leo@adf.ie.

The artist

Born in 1958, Trevor Wray trained in Fine Art painting at York Street Art College, now the University of Ulster, obtaining a degree in 1980. He has had solo exhibitions in St. Patrick's Centre, Downpatrick in 2013 and the Arts & Disability Forum in 2011; he has taken part in many group exhibitions that have toured internationally and has played in various bands. Trevor Wray states his influences as DADA, Robert Rauschenberg, Antoni Tapies, Thomas Hirschhorn, Paul Thek, Isa Genzken,  Jonathan Meese, Outsider Art, and ‘bad art’. However the biggest inspiration for this work is personal mental health.

Trevor’s first significant manifestation of mental ill health was in the final year at art college. The stress of course-work, a final show, the first time living away from home and an art student lifestyle emphasised his experience of breakdown: “I left art college with a poor degree result - a wreck and totally disillusioned with myself. I didn’t know anything about stress or mental health conditions. I took up non-art occupations like factory work and eventually became a postman. I worked at this for 10 years.” It was whilst he was a postman that mental ill health resurfaced.

Following several breakdowns, Trevor was sectioned, hospitalised, diagnosed with Hypermania and eventually this brought retirement from the GPO: “All during this time I was still making art, it was what I aspired towards and it was an outlet for my creativity, energy and Hypermania”. The next step was Ards New Horizons, a training organisation connected to Action Mental Health. Through retraining and work experience, Trevor gained a new qualification as well as self-confidence and self-belief.  He is now cook in a cafe which gives sheltered employment to people with mental health issues or learning disabilities.

 The Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme/ iDA

Trevor Wray is a previous recipient of a grant from the Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme, which was managed by the ADF on behalf of the two Arts Councils of the island and has now ceased The scheme supported individual artistic development and production of new work by artists who on a personal career path. Following withdrawal of funds from An Chomhairle Ealaion, a revised grant scheme will open again shortly on an NI-only basis in partnership with the Arts Council of Northern Ireland. The scheme is called iDA (individual Disabled/Deaf Artists).

 

 

Ebb and Flow
by Cathy Henderson
17 January to 7 March 2014

Ebb and Flow

Ebb and Flow

ADF Gallery, Royal Avenue, Belfast.

Artist's Talk in the ADF Conversations Series:
Thursday 16th January, 4pm, ADF Gallery.
Exhibition Preview: Thursday 16 January, 5-7pm.

'Being on an island we are fortunate to be never far from the coast and the continually changing horizon. The most dynamic and resilient influence on my landscape work is the place where land meets the sea. My aim with these pictures was to capture the transience of the coastal view: a sense of shifting skies, and the persistently fluctuating mood of weather. They are mostly rapidly worked pictures, however work in this land and seascape series rarely comes together rapidly, being the distillation of many more discarded sketches, studies and drawings.'

Born in London, Cathy Henderson grew up in Northern Ireland before moving to Paris and then to Dublin to study at the National College of Art and Design from where she graduated with a Masters of Fine Art in 1993. Her work is in numerous private and public collections in Europe and North America. In addition to her continued fascination with land and seascape, Cathy also focuses a great deal of time and energy on portraiture and figurative work.

In 2007 she worked as artist in residence in Dublin City Council and in 2009 at St James’s Hospital, Dublin. These residencies resulted in two exhibitions of paintings which documented cleansing, maintenance and technical support personnel and used audio recordings in tandem with painted portraits. In 2010 she was awarded a commission from the Museums of Northern Ireland to produce etched prints for inclusion in the touring exhibition of the work of Samson Roche. In the same year she received an Arts Council Artist in the Community award to fund a large scale visual art project with a group of long-term prisoners.

Since 1998 Cathy has taken part four times in the great Northern Arts Festival North of the Arctic Circle in Canada and in 2011, with funding from Culture Ireland, she held a solo exhibition of relief prints in Whitehorse, capital of the Yukon Territory. She recently completed a commissioned project with the Dublin painter Robert Ballagh to design a commemorative artwork celebrating  the centenary of the 1913 Lockout and the establishment of the ITGWU.

Cathy Henderson is a previous recipient of a grant from the Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme, which is managed by the ADF on behalf of the two Arts Councils of the island. The scheme is currently closed but is expected to open again in April 2014.

 

may cause shortening - jayne cherry

Jayne Cherry
may cause shortening
ADF Gallery
March 21 to April 25, 2014

On Thursday 20 March, 5-7pm, there will be an exhibition preview at the Arts & Disability Forum of an Installation by Jayne Cherry. Jayne explains the motivations of this exhibition.

‘Examining the origin of pain and discomfort and our perception and attitude towards it brought to my attention how our bodies function under the stress of disease. The human femur is our largest bone but is extremely delicate in comparison to the load bearing work it performs everyday. Bacteria is essential for life but also contributes to the aetiology of many conditions that can affect mobility. Casting lead glass, sterling silver and wax to engage, explore and understand these elements have allowed me to accept mobility limitations’.

On Wednesday 9th April, between 2-4, Jayne will present a performance in the Gallery that will integrate with the work on show.  Jayne will give a talk about her work as part of the ADF’s Conversations series on Tuesday 15 April beginning at 2pm. BSL communication support can be made available for both activities.

The preview will be at 5-7pm on Thursday 20 March in the ADF Gallery on Royal Avenue. Light refreshments will be available. Following the preview, the exhibition will be open to the public, from 21 March until 25th April between 11am to 3pm, Tuesday to Friday. For further information, images from the exhibition, interviews with the artist, please telephone: 028 9023 9450 or email leo@adf.ie .

The artist

Cherry uses her observations of learning from nature, animals and humans gleaned by living on an organic farm from birth, practising animal husbandry continually and nursing humans for twenty years in her practise. Perception of others and their attitudes to experiences are the focus of her work which has an ever present underlay of sensitivity. Cherry makes forms that marry up differing materials to cause a cognitive recognition and dissonance in the viewers mind. Performing live allows direct interaction in the gallery space as well as the public arena where sound can be made using her voice, tools and fabric. Graduating from the University of Ulster in Sculpture, Time, Video and Photography in 2011, has allowed Cherry to incorporate a wide spectrum of skills. She is currently a Director and Curator of Pollen Studios and Gallery, Belfast also working in Art Education in The Ulster Museum, Belfast as well as continuing to work as an exhibiting artist.

Jayne Cherry is previous recipient of a grant from the Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme, which was managed by the ADF on behalf of the two Arts Councils of the island. The scheme is no longer operating.

 

Joel Simon (mis) SHAPE
Joel Simon (mis) SHAPE

The Arts & Disability Forum and the
Strule Arts Centre, Omagh

present:
Selected - ADF Group Show
Cathy Henderson, David Hughes, Fergus Jordan
Rowena Keaveny, Roisin O’Hagan and Joel Simon
5 to 30 April, 2014

Opening: Friday 4 April at 1:30pm, followed by a gallery talk and film screening by Orla Russell-Conway and Joel Simon at 3:15pm

gallery opening hours Monday - Saturday, 10am to 5:30pm
admission free; gallery accessible

Strule Arts Centre
Townhall Square,
Omagh, Co.Tyrone
BT78 1BL

www.struleartscentre.co.uk; tel 028 8224 7831

www.adf.ie; tel 028 9023 9450; text 07534 863 449

On Friday 4 April at 1:30pm, there will be an exhibition launch at Strule Arts Center in Omagh, of a group exhibition selected by the Arts & Disability Forum. Artists are: Cathy Henderson, David Hughes, Fergus Jordan, Rowena Keaveny, Roisin O’Hagan and Joel Simon. Following the launch, there will be an informal gallery talk about the Arts & Disability Forum’s work and the artists whose work is on display (led by Chris Ledger and Leo Devlin from the ADF). There will then be film screenings from Orla Russell-Conway and Joel Simon.

Orla Russell-Conway: Henry and Sunny
Orla Russell-Conway: Henry and Sunny

Each artist in this exhibition is a previous recipient of a grant from the Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme, which has been managed by the ADF in Belfast on a cross-border basis until this year. All the artists have gone on to exhibit nationally and internationally. This exhibition simply celebrates their achievements and, although this is coincidental, commemorates the end of a scheme that has been much valued by artists.

Following the preview, the exhibition will be open to the public from 5th April until 30th April between 10am and 5:30pm.

For further information, images from the exhibition, interviews with the artists, or to book communication support, please telephone: 028 9023 9450, email leo@adf.ie or text 07534 863 449.

The Artists

Cathy Henderson: Ebb and Flow

Cathy Henderson
Cathy Henderson

This series has been produced over the last three years and features seascapes and the rocky coastal edges of Ireland.

“Being on an island we are fortunate to never be far from the coast and the continually changing horizon. The most dynamic and resilient influence on my landscape work is the place where land meets the sea. My aim with these pictures was to capture the transience of the coastal view: a sense of shifting skies, and the persistently fluctuating mood of weather. They are mostly rapidly worked pictures however work in this land and seascape series rarely comes together rapidly, being the distillation of many more discarded sketches, studies and drawings.”

Born in London, Cathy Henderson grew up in Northern Ireland before moving to Paris and then to Dublin to study at the National College of Art and Design, from where she graduated with a Masters of Fine Art in 1993. Her work is in numerous private and public collections in Europe and North America. In addition to her continued fascination with land and seascape, Cathy also focuses a great deal of time and energy on portraiture and figurative work.

David Hughes: Cosmic Microwave Background

David Hughes
David Hughes

“The CMB is a snapshot of the oldest light in our Universe...  It shows tiny temperature fluctuations... [which] represent the seeds of all future structure: the stars and galaxies of today.“ Dr. Torsten Enßlin

This series is produced through bricolage (made from whatever materials David Hughes has to hand). He tries to make them nebulous, somewhat amorphous or ambiguous and he hopes they encourage pareidolia, allowing the viewer to see distinct and meaningful objects – faces, landscapes and scenarios.

“Like CMB itself, the works contain the very old, the very young and the resonances of past events, like the old man and boy voices on the Shedd soundtrack. They are made from various kinds of building block, in this case of language, as in the key words cards. And there are intensities of light, the viscous subjects of the photographs having been subjected to intense light states and coloured by the addition of printer inks. And, seemingly taken by satellite, there are photos of nebulae and planet surfaces. The use of microwaves is both a visual pun on cosmic microwave radiation and alludes to my once mistaking microwave ovens for TV sets.”

David Hughes trained as an actor before studying philosophy and critical theory at Warwick and Southampton. For 25 years he has juggled work as an arts journalist, magazine editor and publisher, academic and writer. His magazine archive is held by Bristol University’s Live Art Collection. Since 2007, with a series of ADAI awards, he has produced work for the exhibitions ‘What Inspires You’, ‘Winter’s Chill’, ‘I Run’ and ‘The Case of the Drowned Archive’, all at the ADF Gallery. Motivated by ideas and processes more than by a medium or practice, he has produced paintings, print, sculpture, photography, multi-media text works and video. Current plans are to exhibit the Nebula and Tundra photographs and to make a live performance work Tadeusz Kantor Combs His Hair, based on meetings with some of the most influential artists of the last 75 years. www.dhbricolage.net

Fergus Jordan: Under Cover of Darkness

Fergus Jordan
Fergus Jordan

This series explores relationships between vision, night and territory in the north of Ireland. Night becomes the backdrop but also the catalyst to amplify tension. Pools of light physically fragment space, corresponding to political connotations of division. Throughout the work, darkness and streetlight are used to stage a nocturnal landscape that is haunted by paranoia and mutual distrust.

Fergus Jordan is a Belfast based artist who has recently completed doctoral research study in Photography. His work with photography and video investigates the conflict between darkness, night and artificial light, city in photography, the invisible, and the study of post-conflict societies.

Rowena Keaveny: Vocalise

Rowena Keaveny
Rowena Keaveny

“As an artist I feel it’s fundamentally important for arts practice to both reflect and engage in a meaningful way with the community it seeks to represent.”

Using paint, collage, text and digital print, with an array of colour and texture, Rowena Keaveny has spent the last few  years looking at what people saying and why they might be saying it. This series examines the changing global, national and local context, showing citizens faced with unprecedented circumstances, forced to find voices and to verbalise objections to threats that erode autonomy.

Rowena Keaveny  is a visual artist and arts facilitator living in the Irish Midlands and to date she has had fourteen solo exhibitions. She has also been a recipient of bursaries from the Community Foundation of Ireland (2012, 2012,2010); The Ireland Funds (2011); The Arts and Disability Awards Ireland scheme (2005,2007,2010,2013); Tyrone Guthrie Award (Offaly County Council-2009); Artist in the Community Award, Create and the Arts Council (2009) and The Arts Council (2004). Her work is in public and private collections including Laois County Council, Offaly County Council, The Dublin Leinster H.S.E +I.P.W (Irish State Collection). Alongside solo work Rowena is also an arts faciltator at Clara Day Care Centre with Anam Beo, an Arts & Health organisation working with older people in residential and day care settings in County Offaly.

Roisin O’Hagan: Ancestral Threads

Roisin O'Hagan
Roisin O'Hagan

Trained as a painter, Roisin now considers herself a painter who uses fibres. This series is of small pieces made from wool, linen, silk and cotton, some of which use old family linens, including tablecloths and runners. Roisin hand-dyes, then tears the dyed fibres and fabrics into smaller parts. Using a machine embellisher, she ‘paints’ by forcing fibres into a backing fabric - a technique not unlike felting. Using old photographs, mainly of family members, as reference she then ‘sketches’ portraits onto backgrounds, by hand stitching. Within the backgrounds are representations of old stories: commonplace accounts of the artist’s rural ancestors and of her current extended family inspire her work.

Joel Simon: (mis) SHAPE

Joel Simmon
Joel Simmon

“What represents normal? How do we define mis-shapes?  The amputated character which I’ve created stands out from his surroundings by virtue of being an artificial and synthetic effigy in an otherwise gritty and desolate landscape. Left to his own devices he represents the norm. Surrounded by a group of identical-looking bipeds he stands out and becomes an object of scrutiny.

My images are a visual representation of our innate urge to avoid standing out from the norm. Whatever represents the norm. The desire to conform is huge. The desire to be seen as an individual is equally huge and the balance between the two is what fascinates me - it often defines who we are and what we do. By reducing these characters to their simplest shapes and features, I have preserved their personalities and accentuated their fear of standing out.”

Joel Simon is a multi disciplinary artist from Belgium, whose work is influenced by the comic books he read as a child. Residing in Belfast, his work has been seen all over the world. His primary art form is animation. He has founded the animation studio Flickerpix, directed TV series and short films such as MACROPOLIS, which formed part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad and has been screened in over 100 international film festivals, with 10 awards to date. His other animation work has been broadcast on BBC One, CBBC, Channel 4, History and Discover Channels and Sesame Street. Joel also paints oil portraiture, with a quirk.

The Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme

All the artists are previous recipients of grants from the Arts & Disability Awards Ireland scheme, which was managed by the ADF on behalf of the two Arts Councils of the island, closing this year. Following the withdrawal of funds from An Chomhairle Ealaion, grants to disabled artists will now be managed on a separate jurisdictional basis.

 

Notice of Extraordinary General Meeting
Of members of the  Arts & Disability Forum

2pm, Thursday 20th March 2014

ADF, Managed Workspace
109 Royal Avenue, Belfast.

Papers for the above meeting can be downloaded from the links below.

Click on the documents and then 'save' them to your hard drive.  Or ask for them to be sent to you by emailing: charter@adf.ie  

DOWNLOADS

Notice of Extraordinary General Meeting of ADF 20 March 2014

The reasons we want to change in the Articles of Association-2014

Proxy voting form EGM March 2014

ADF Current Constitution

Proposed Amended ADF Constitution 2014

Pages: 1 2

Navigation

Use Ctrl +/- keys to zoom page.
Return to home page, from anywhere on the site, by clicking the header image or logo.

Contact Us

Want to ask a question, make a suggestion or a comment?

Send us an email by clicking on this link...

Send us your news and information about events and opportunities for us to distribute to our membership.

Email news, events and opportunities information here...

We are here

Arts & Disability Forum
Ground Floor
Cathedral Quarter Workspaces
109-113 Royal Avenue
Belfast
BT1 1FF

Tel within UK:
(028) 9023 9450

Tel from RoI:
(048) 9023 9450

Fax:
(028) 9024 7770

E-mail:
info@adf.ie

Web:
http://www.adf.ie

PUBLIC OPENING HOURS:
Tuesday - Friday:
11am – 3pm

The above are our core hours but we are often working away behind the scenes at other times. If the gallery lights are on just ring the bell and we’ll let you in.

healthlibr.com